Campaigns

We believe that building a more just America requires engagement, organizing and leadership. Inspired by Jewish tradition, we must all take action and do our part to build a better future.

Organizing campaigns help put power in the hands of individuals, families, workers and communities, strengthening democracy and moving us closer to the promise of an America where everyone can share in social and economic opportunity, and enjoy equal rights and liberties.

The Bay Area and Southern California regions of Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice are proud to provide this guide to propositions appearing on California’s November ballot. Download the complete guide and read our in-depth analysis of the critical issues on the November 4 ballot.

The impact of mass incarceration on our communities in California is a deeply tragic story — and Bend the Arc is joining a new campaign to turn the tide. Bend the Arc’s Criminal Justice Reform campaign has joined the Yes on Prop 47 campaign to pass the Safe Neighborhoods & Schools Act. Prop 47 will change sentencing for petty crimes from felonies to misdemeanors, and direct financial savings to K-12 schools, mental health treatment, and victim services.

Yes on 30

California is in the middle of a budget crisis that is devastating our communities, compromising health and safety, and blocking the path to opportunity for young adults and low-income communities. Join us to create a just and equitable society that provides flexible pathways to self-sufficiency and self-actualization, supported by a community dedicated to the health, well-being, and success of all its inhabitants.

In the wake of the recent Supreme Court decision to dismantle key sections of the Voting Rights Act, Bend the Arc is launching a voting rights campaign and will be working with our allies to pass new legislation to protect the right to vote for all. We can fix this if we act together.

Immigration Reform

Our immigration system is broken, serving neither immigrant families nor the interests of our country, and fixing it is an economic and a moral imperative. Common sense immigration reform is, and should be, a priority for the Jewish community. For many people, our own immigrant stories are still fresh in our family’s collective memory. And the Jewish collective memory speaks to our people as immigrants from the moment Abram was called to “Go forth from your homeland” and down through the millennia.